Riding Level 1  Tag Archives

Ride with Authority

Posted on by jenniferlandels

The final item on the Riding Level 1 scoresheet is: 15. Demonstrate overall authority, safety & confidence This is similar and related to the last point on the Horsemanship Level1 sheet: 11. Demonstrate safety and common sense when working around horses In your riding test you will be marked on your habits from the ground as well as mounted, so…

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Safety in numbers

Posted on by jenniferlandels

Or rather, safety with numbers, is this week's topic.  In other words, how do you 14.  Identify and maintain safe distance in group while riding and halted It's not enough to simply maintain the pace and direction of your own mount in relation to the fixed objects in the ring; you also need to be able to adjust your position…

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Time to Stirrup Things!

Posted on by jenniferlandels

Sorry, it's a dreadful pun, but I couldn't resist. The stirrup is arguably one of the most important inventions in the history of mounted warfare, and of riding in general.  The advent of the stirrup allowed a rider to mount more easily (making it feasible to wear heavier armour into battle), to rise out of the saddle and isolate his…

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Using the sword hand

Posted on by jenniferlandels

Last week I talked about freeing the sword hand by using the reins in one hand.  This week we'll deal with what to do with that free hand as we  12. Safely carry and move a long object (dressage or buggy whip, flag, sword etc) at the walk and trot The purpose of this part of the test is not…

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Freeing the sword hand

Posted on by jenniferlandels

Up till now all discussing of the Riding 1 curriculum has implied the use of two hands on the reins.  This is because we ride with English tack in the Cavaliere program and teach English style riding (for the reasons for this see these previous posts: English or Western pt I and pt II).  However, it's fairly obvious that at…

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Stick ’em up … or down

Posted on by jenniferlandels

I had to be careful with the title of this week's post.  Didn't want it turning up in the wrong sort of searches,* as the next item on the Riding 1 checklist is: 9. Show correct way to hold a whip/crop     This is one of the skills we ask for in our level 1 that doesn't turn up…

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Don’t look down!

Posted on by jenniferlandels

Back from holidays and back to business. This week our riding skill is: 8. Walk and trot over single ground poles and a group of 3-4 trot poles Riding over ground poles is the beginning of learning how to jump, but is also a useful exercise in and of itself for improving a horse's way of going.  A ground pole…

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Rein-changing pt II

Posted on by jenniferlandels

Last week I talked about the dressage letters in the riding ring, and how to use them to increase your accuracy.  The exercise was a change of rein at the walk across the school from B to E.  In your level 1 riding test we also ask you to: 7. Change rein on long diagonal at trot The long diagonal…

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Alphabet soup: dressage arena letters

Posted on by jenniferlandels

Take a lesson at almost any riding school and you will hear a stream of letters flowing past: "twenty metre circle at C", "between K and A develop working canter", "change rein FXH" and so on.  These letters are not acronyms or arcane code, but simply markers on the dressage arena. No one seems to know for sure why the…

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A post on posting

Posted on by jenniferlandels

No, this is not about blogging, or fenceposts (that was last week), but on rising or 'posting' to the trot. The trot is a 2-beat gait in which the horse's legs move in diagonal pairs (last week's post has the Eadward Muybridge photo series on the trot).  It is the roughest gait to sit, which is why the technique of…

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