Choreography is a Physical Story

I just watched The Raid: Redemption (and I thought colons were only used for sequels, silly me!) which is a film that was hyped in martial arts cinema, and fits in the sub-genre of “Take The Castle”. It’s a fun genre. Troy is an excellent example: fortified city, army within besieged by an army without.…

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Alphabet soup: dressage arena letters

Take a lesson at almost any riding school and you will hear a stream of letters flowing past: “twenty metre circle at C”, “between K and A develop working canter”, “change rein FXH” and so on.  These letters are not acronyms or arcane code, but simply markers on the dressage arena. No one seems to…

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Strike with Vivacity

Studying self-defense and combat too often starts with blocks, parries or other methods of intercepting attacks. All of these techniques rely on seeing the opponent attack and choosing the appropriate movement to deal with it. The reactionary stance will keep you moving backward, looking for the next threat, and a victim of the attacker’s speed,…

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The Riding Curriculum

Over the past dozen weeks or so I’ve written posts detailing the requirements for our Horsemanship Level 1.  If you read through those posts, look at the relevant chapters of the Manual of Horsemanship, and attend at least three Horsemanship classes in which you have the opportunity to practice handling, grooming and tacking up, you…

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Horse Sense

The final item on Horsemanship 1 checklist is: 11. Demonstrate safety and common sense when working around horses This is something our examiners make note of during the whole of the horsemanship assessment. We want to see that you are calm, confident, and sensible while handling your horse. Most candidates are very good at staying…

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A Stable Situation: needs and habits of the horse

Aside from food, which was covered in last week’s post, a horse needs shelter and security.  These topics were both covered in previous posts (see links). For the Horsemanship 1 test we ask about 10. Stabling: needs and habits of the horse Along with reference to food, secure fencing, and shelter, we want to see…

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The Well-Groomed Horse

Grooming the horse is one of the most important skill sets a rider needs to have.  It allows you to check your horse for injuries, helps increase the circulation to his skin and muscles, prevents chafing from dirt under the tack, improves his appearance, and provides valuable bonding time. As you progress through your Horsemanship…

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