Taste of the Renaissance Beginner's Course

Four Strategies to Combat Technique Repetition Boredom

“The difference between an advanced action and a simple action is that an advanced action is a simple action done very, very well.” A student and colleague of mine reminded me of this quote recently. I very much enjoy its sentiment every time I’m exposed to it. It reminds me of how much of my…

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How to Keep an Effective Training Journal

For many years I have kept a training journal. This is a log book of personal practice goals, training plans, progress toward those goals, and a ticker tape of general thoughts, comments, struggles, and successes. At its simplest, the journal is a way of keeping my training front-of-mind and it helps me keep continuity from…

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Four Ways to Get Back to Enjoyment and Out of Criticality

Practising does not always mean “working on”. It’s important to give yourself time with the passions and skills in your life to just simply indulge in the activity. It’s vital to allow yourself on occasion to indulge in pure enjoyment. This helps you remember why you do this thing in the first place, and can…

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Seven Ideas for Setting Useful Sword Training Goals

Objective measures can be compelling. They’re easy to inspect and they can allow you to see progress in a way you can graph. However, often people choose the wrong goals to measure and this has a detrimental effect on their development. For example, when a student gets focused on winning or “getting hits”, a few…

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